• Kings of Leon album NFT
    Cryptocurrencies

    Kings of Leon releasing next album on non-fungible tokens

    The tokens will allow the band’s fans to access exclusive content and experiences that are not available anywhere else

    Kings of Leon plans to release three different kinds of NFTs as part of its “NFT Yourself” series. One is a special album package, another one offers live show perks like front-row seats for life, and the third features exclusive audiovisual art. All those NFTs include art designed by the band’s go-to artist partner, Night After Night.

  • NFT art Beeple sells $6.6 million
    adblock,  Cryptocurrencies,  Technology

    Beeple NFT artwork sells for $6.6 million

    Non-fungible token artwork seller Nifty Gateway called the sale of the Donald Trump-bashing piece by Mike “Beeple” Winkelmann historic

    The unique NFT art was part of the first drop on Nifty Gateway by Beeple, also known as Mike Winkelmann. The record-setting price was obtained when “CROSSROAD #1/1” was resold on the secondary market, the company said on Twitter. “History has been made,” it added. “We can confirm that this is a legitimate sale - this was brokered by Nifty Gateway's art buying services."

  • Uniswap Unisocks tokens
    Alt coins,  Education

    Uniswap socks-backed tokens reach $92K

    185 of the tokens have been burned to redeem the footwear. This could be the most expensive hosiery that the world has ever seen. UPDATE: They’re at $158,000

    According to crypto asset market data website CoinGecko, the value of the NFT SOCKS tokens—each backed by a pair of Uniswap-branded socks that can be redeemed for the token—reached an all-time high of $92,763.27 on Feb. 16. At their highest, the 500 SOCKS had a market cap of about $28 million.

  • Enjin NFT fashion
    Technology

    Blockchain game developer Enjin is bringing fashion sense to alternate reality

    Non-fungible tokens will allow AR gamers to collect, use and resell unique to fashion items that can be worn by users’ avatars in games and the ‘real’ world

    Those clothes and accessories can be used on avatars created on the augmented-reality MetaverseMe app, where videos injecting them into the users’ real-world surroundings can be shot, and shared on social media. Those avatars can also be used in shared virtual reality open-world settings.