• Brian Brooks leaves OCC
    Cryptocurrencies,  Regulation

    Crypto-friendly Brian Brooks steps down as bank overseer

    The former Coinbase executive’s rulings at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency aided the cryptocurrency industry by allowing banks to custody and make payments with stablecoins

    During his eight months at the head of the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Brooks, a former general counsel at Coinbase, enacted a number of reforms that helped push the cryptocurrency industry farther into the banking industry’s mainstream, most recently authorizing banks to use stablecoins to make payments and for other transactions on behalf of customers.

  • OCC banks can use stablecoins
    Regulation

    In a ‘huge’ win, regulator says banks can make payments with stablecoins

    Circle’s Jeremy Allaire said the ruling by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency ‘helps put the U.S. in a leadership position in embracing the power of public blockchains’

    Allaire said Acting Comptroller of the Currency Brian Brooks’ latest move is “a HUGE way to start 2021, the year that crypto and stablecoins go mass market!” He added, "the significance of this can’t be understated.”

  • OCC banks cannot discriminate crypto
    Cryptocurrencies,  Politics,  Regulation

    Treasury Dept says banks cannot discriminate against industries like crypto

    Acting Comptroller of the Currency Brian Brooks, a former Coinbase executive, issued another ruling aiding cryptocurrency companies

    Targeting one of the cryptocurrencies biggest complaints, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency proposed a rule on Nov. 20 that would require banks to “provide access to services, capital, and credit based on the risk assessment of individual customers, rather than broad-based decisions affecting whole categories or classes of customers.”

  • SEC questions Wyoming custody
    Regulation,  United States

    SEC taking dim view of Wyoming’s claim it can authorize crypto custody

    The Securities and Exchange Commission is seeking comments on Wyoming’s recent No-Action Letter authorizing state-chartered trust companies to custody traditional and digital assets

    The Wyoming letter asserts that the state-chartered trust companies are allowed to be “qualified custodians” for digital assets. In response, the SEC’s Division of Investment Management published its own staff statement highlighting that the Wyoming letter made clear that it “expressly states that the letter ‘should not be construed to represent the views of the SEC or any other regulatory agency.’”