• Where the magic happens: The Securities and Exchange Commission's Washington, DC headquarters (via Shutterstock).
    United States

    SEC issues first no-action letter to an ICO issuer

    While not binding, the SEC staff’s opinion sends a strong sign that the ICO will be approved

    The Securities and Exchange Commission’s Division of Corporation Finance Wednesday issued its first “no-action” letter informing a would-be ICO producer that it did not consider its tokens securities and would not recommend enforcement action against it for proceeding with the sale.

  • The caption for this is "Young crypto engineer applying form of characteristics of new bitcoin mining hardware," but we're not quite sold that's accurate (via Shutterstock).
    Innovators,  Technology,  United States

    Ford, Verizon, Revlon among companies looking to up their blockchain game

    Distributed ledger technology is a skill sought in firms not traditionally associated with the blockchain or cryptocurrency industry

    There’s been a lot of attention paid in the last few days about the amount of blockchain and cryptocurrency jobs available at banks like JPMorgan and accounting firms like PricewaterhouseCoopers and Deloitte, but there are more than a few large, non-finance firms looking to hire people with blockchain knowhow and experience right now, including Ford, Revlon, and Penske Logistics, according to LinkedIn Jobs.

  • SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce speaking at New York University, March 26, 2018 (photo by Lawrence Lewitinn for Modern Consensus).
    United States

    Crypto Mom says SEC takes nanny state approach

    SEC Commissioner Hester Peirce thinks regulatory overreach is hindering cryptocurrency innovation

    Hester Peirce doesn’t want the government to protect you from dumb cryptocurrency investments. Speaking at a taping of Laura Shin’s Unchained podcast at NYU’s Stern School of Business on March 26, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s “Crypto Mom”—a nickname she picked up after dissenting from the commission’s June 2018 decision not to approve a cryptocurrency exchange traded fund (ETF)—expressed a belief that her agency should be focused on protecting securities investors from fraud, not hindering speculation.