• LedgerX CEO Paul Chou accuses CFTC Chairman Giancarlo of vendetta
    Regulation

    LedgerX accused ex-CFTC Chair J. Christopher Giancarlo of vendetta

    An unflattering blog post by LedgerX CEO Paul Chou led to a campaign of delays to the exchange’s license to offer physically settled Bitcoin futures, the firm alleged

    Cryptocurrency derivatives exchange LedgerX has accused former U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission Chairman J. Christopher Giancarlo of carrying out a revenge campaign. LedgerX wrote two letters of complaining about Giancarlo to the CFTC in July, Coindesk reported September 28. Giancarlo is known as “Crypto-Dad” because of his favorable view of the cryptocurrency industry. Coindesk obtained the letters, written on July 3 and July 11 from the CFTC via a Freedom of Information Act request. In them, LedgerX CEO Paul Chou claimed Giancarlo deliberately sabotaged and delayed its vital derivatives clearing organization (DCO) license application. “In January, the Chairman called one of our board members and told him that he was going…

  • LedgerX CEO Paul Chou could learn a thing or two from George Carlin (via LedgerX).
    United States

    LedgerX spokesperson quits after CEO’s profanity-laced tirade against federal regulators

    RGPR’s Ryan Gormley dropped LedgerX after Paul Chou lashed out at the CFTC on Twitter

    An hour after Chou accused the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) regulator of acting in bad faith and being in the pocket of one of the largest companies it oversees, RGPR agency founder Ryan Gormley took to twitter with a message of his own.

  • Once upon a time, this is how they would trade futures (via Wikicommons)
    Bitcoin,  United States

    LedgerX beats NASDAQ and ICE to the retail cryptocurrency futures market

    The CFTC has awarded the company the first futures trading license open to individuals rather than institutions

    The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) announced on June 25 that it has approved LedgerX’s application as a designated contract market (DCM). A DCM may “list for trading futures or option contracts based on all types of commodities and that may allow access to their facilities by all types of traders, including retail customers,” according to the CFTC.