• Telegram SEC settlement
    Cryptocurrencies,  People,  Regulation

    Telegram and SEC agree on settlement, $1.2B to be returned to investors

    ‘We hope the regulatory environment for blockchain technology in the US becomes more favorable for others in the future,’ Telegram CEO Pavel Durov says

    For eight months, the encrypted messaging app and the regulator have been coming to blows—with the SEC claiming the company’s $1.7 billion sale of gram tokens was an illegal securities sale. Under the deal announced on June 26, Telegram would pay an $18.5 million penalty and return $1.2 billion—about 70% of the funds raised—to investors.

  • SEC shoots down Telegram
    Alt coins,  Regulation

    SEC shoots down Telegram’s TON blockchain

    Well-known cryptocurrency lawyer Stephen Palley tells Modern Consensus that the Telegram Open Network blockchain’s demise will create headaches for projects funded in similar ways

    Telegram CEO Pavel Durov announced on May 12 that his messaging platform’s active involvement with TON is over—using a blog post to lambast the U.S. judge who effectively stopped the project from going ahead.

  • Durov bets the house
    Cryptocurrencies,  Regulation

    Telegram’s Pavel Durov bets the house on TON

    Pummeled by in court by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Pavel Durov offered TON blockchain investors a choice: a 28% loss now or 10% profit in a year—backed by equity in his Telegram messaging platform

    In an April 30 letter to investors, Durov put his stake in the Telegram messaging app on the table, offering to reimburse 110% of their investment with his own money if they let their gram token investment ride for another year. Otherwise, they can cash out now, getting back 72 cents on the dollar.

  • 11 crypto firms sued illegal ICOs
    Cryptocurrencies,  People,  Regulation

    Crypto faces ‘The man who took on Wall Street’

    On the day before the statute of limitations expired, the lawyer who extracted $25 billion from banks over the subprime mortgage crisis sued 11 cryptocurrency firms for holding illegal ICOs

    Eleven cryptocurrency issuers and exchanges including Tron, Block.one, and Binance were hit with class action lawsuits last week for holding or supporting initial coin offerings. Ominously, they were filed by a group of lawyers led by Philippe Selendy, who the Financial Times called “The man who took on Wall Street” after he forced 16 major banks including Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and JPMorgan Chase to pay $25 billion for their part in the subprime mortgage crisis that sparked the Great Recession of 2007.