• Cryptocurrencies,  Regulation,  United States

    SEC: Telegram lied about its ICO

    The Securities and Exchange Commission is ‘deeply troubled’ by blockchain developer’s refusal to turn over bank records; Telegram condemns the SEC’s ‘scorched earth’ attack on SAFT utility token sales

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asked a judge on Thursday to make messaging service turned blockchain developer Telegram open its books in an effort to stop what it believes is an illegal securities offering. Telegram raised $1.7 billion in the first quarter of 2018 by pre-selling 2.9 million gram tokens.

  • Chairman Mao sees you illegally trading cryptocurrency (via David Dennis, CC-BY-SA 2.0)
    Bitcoin,  Regulation

    Was China’s digital yuan behind Binance’s Shanghai office closing?

    The November closure of a Shanghai office connected to a major crypto exchange may have presaged a broader crackdown as China prepares to launch a virtual currency

    The high-profile closing of a Shanghai office used by the Binance exchange in late November appears to have been an early example of China’s latest crackdown on cryptocurrency trading.

  • This is for my boyfriend, so don't tell my husband! (Library of Congress via Wikimedia Commons).
    Cryptocurrencies,  Regulation

    Rationing Privacy: ECB suggests digital currency ‘anonymity vouchers’

    An EU-issued central bank digital currency could provide an allowance of tokens good for keeping Big Brother from looking at your spending

    Planning to score some cocaine before meeting your girlfriend at a hotel? Neither the cops nor your wife will be any the wiser if you use some of the “anonymity vouchers” Europe’s central bank just proposed building into an e-euro. It’s kind of like trying to sneak across a room unseen by screaming, “nobody look at me!”

  • Dirty money is as big as the EU's budget, and former EU Justice Commissioner Věra_Jourová wants a bigger cut (via Wikipedia, CC-BY-SA-2.0).
    Regulation

    Citing customer privacy concerns three EU cryptocurrency firms close

    Bottle Pay, Chopcoin, and Simplecoin shut down in December rather than enforce new European Union anti-money laundering rules

    Citing customer privacy concerns brought on by strict new European Union anti-money laundering laws, three cryptocurrency companies announced plans to shut down in December. The first was bitcoin gaming platform Chopcoin, which announced in November that it would close on Dec. 16. The company cited “regulatory concerns [that would] force KYC on our users.” KYC stands for “know your customer” banking regulations used to fight money laundering and combat the financing of terrorism (CFT). The other two firms planning to close up shop this month, Simplecoin and Bottle Pay, also cited moral principles. They refused to go along with the European Union’s Fifth Anti-Money Laundering Directive regulations, which come into force on…