• Cointelegraph's new editors: Jay Cassano (left) is editor in chief while Dylan Love (right) is news editor (courtesy of Cointelegraph).
    Media

    EXCLUSIVE: Cointelegraph finally gets new editors

    Veteran investigative journalist Jay Cassano is now editor in chief, Dylan Love is head of news

    Crypto news site Cointelegraph now has two new editors. Veteran journalist Jay Cassano will be taking the helm of the publication as editor in chief, while Dylan Love will be head of news. Though still widely read in crypto, Cointelegraph had been officially rudderless since mid-September. That’s when executive editor Olivia Capozzalo and head of news Molly Jane Zuckerman simultaneously quit. As proof for those who believe crypto journalism is one giant revolving door, Zuckerman has been a contributor to Modern Consensus, a role her replacement at Cointelegraph used to hold for about nine months.

  • University of Texas Tower (via Wiki commons).
    Opinion,  Tether

    Tether/Bitfinex study gets updated while Crypto Twitter gets angry

    The report that claimed Bitcoin prices were manipulated via Tether now says a single “whale” was behind the trades; those with skin in the game react negatively

    The lead academic in that (in)famous study postulating that Bitcoin prices were manipulated by Tether updated it with this added doozey: a single “whale” was behind most of it, trading large amounts of bitcoin against tether on Bitfinex, Tether’s sister company.

  • Chad Cascarilla, CEO & co-founder of Paxos, being interviewed by Mark Yusko, CEO & chief investment officer of Morgan Creek Capital Management for RealVision on October 8, 2019 (screenshot).
    Bitcoin

    Financial markets similar to NYC sewers: Paxos CEO

    ‘How do you take the $600 trillion of assets, change essentially where they sit so that they can be moved around instantaneously by a much wider variety of people.’

    What’s the difference between the global financial markets and New York City’s sewer system? One is a filthy, chaotic mess of human waste unable to handle even the slightest increase in use without making everything stink while the other one is run by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.