• Are rewards points the best use case for blockchain technology (via Wiki commons).
    Technology

    Bringing smart contracts to consumer loyalty rewards programs

    Blockchain-as-a-service provider Loyyal is betting distributed ledger technology can reduce costs and improve customer satisfaction

    Consumer loyalty is a business that Greg Simon, the founder and CEO of Loyyal, thinks is ripe for disruption by blockchain technology, and particularly smart contracts.

  • Blockchain project jobs
    Innovators,  Media,  Technology

    Forbes 50 list of top companies using blockchain released

    Only three “pure” blockchain companies made the list of the $1 billion-plus firms

    Forbes on Tuesday announced its inaugural Forbes 50 list of large companies leading the way in developing and using blockchain technology. The list has a notable lack of “pure” blockchain firms. In fact, there are just three—blockchain hardware and software maker Bitfury, cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase, and financial blockchain developer Ripple.

  • The caption for this is "Young crypto engineer applying form of characteristics of new bitcoin mining hardware," but we're not quite sold that's accurate (via Shutterstock).
    Innovators,  Technology,  United States

    Ford, Verizon, Revlon among companies looking to up their blockchain game

    Distributed ledger technology is a skill sought in firms not traditionally associated with the blockchain or cryptocurrency industry

    There’s been a lot of attention paid in the last few days about the amount of blockchain and cryptocurrency jobs available at banks like JPMorgan and accounting firms like PricewaterhouseCoopers and Deloitte, but there are more than a few large, non-finance firms looking to hire people with blockchain knowhow and experience right now, including Ford, Revlon, and Penske Logistics, according to LinkedIn Jobs.

  • Children of the Democratic Republic of Congo (via Shutterstock).
    Africa,  Technology

    From the Congo to the open ocean, blockchain is helping companies ethically source natural resources

    IBM Blockchain is being used to ensure the batteries in your car and laptop do not use cobalt mined by children

    Auto manufacturer Ford Motor Company and battery maker LG Chem announced on Jan. 16 that they are joining forces with a major Chinese mining firm on a pilot project to use IBM Blockchain technology to trace the origin of the mineral cobalt used in batteries. More than half of the world supply of cobalt is mined in the war torn Democratic Republic of Congo, where illegally mined minerals and diamonds often fund brutal militias, and child labor and hazardous working conditions are common.