• PayPal crypto
    Bitcoin,  Cryptocurrencies,  Ethereum,  Litecoin

    PayPal crypto service goes live

    The digital payments company’s U.S. customers can now buy and sell bitcoin, ether, bitcoin cash, and litecoin in their accounts, heralding a new level of mainstream availability for cryptocurrencies

    Announced last month, the crypto support went live for U.S. customers on Nov. 12, marking a new level of mainstream availability of cryptocurrency. In addition, PayPal said it will “significantly increase cryptocurrency's utility” as it will be usable for purchases at the company’s network of 26 million merchants worldwide.

  • Is PayPal buying BitGo
    Bitcoin,  Ethereum,  Litecoin

    Bloomberg: Is PayPal buying crypto custodian BitGo?

    The report cites anonymous sources who say PayPal is in talks to buy crypto firms including the competitor of its announced custodian Paxos

    Citing anonymous sources, the Bloomberg report said that PayPal Holdings is looking to double down on its jump into crypto this week. No other firms were mentioned by name, and the sources made clear BitGo was not a done deal.

  • PayPal adds support Bitcoin
    Bitcoin,  Cryptocurrencies,  Ethereum,  Litecoin

    PayPal adds support for bitcoin, other cryptos

    26 million merchants will be able to accept payments in bitcoin, ether, bitcoin cash, and litecoin ‘in the coming weeks’

    Saying the “shift to digital forms of currencies is inevitable,” PayPal president and CEO Dan Schulman announced that customers would be able to buy, sell, and hold bitcoin and three other cryptocurrencies in their accounts.

  • Governments don’t trust crypto
    Bitcoin,  Cryptocurrencies,  Regulation

    Governments, financial firms don’t trust crypto

    A new survey suggests the crypto industry is adamant it can prevent cybercrime and money laundering, but this optimism isn’t shared by governments and financial firms

    “Bridging this gap is essential, as all sectors agree that the use of cryptocurrency is on the rise, but we know there’s no clear consensus on domestic regulatory action," said Kayla Izenman. "This risks opening the door to illicit activities.”