• Technology

    VeChain serves up ready-to-use blockchain applications for food safety

    In an attempt to sweeten the deal for food brands reluctant to turn to blockchain because it’s expensive, the traceability company has released a cost-conscious platform

    Although the technology shows a lot of promise, there’s one problem with creating a food-tracking blockchain: it requires an upfront investment, making it expensive for companies to embrace. Many end up building their own applications from scratch, and struggle to understand exactly how it works.

  • Singapore food safety on blockchain
    Technology

    Singapore is betting blockchain can cure its food safety crisis

    The city-state imports more than 90% of its food, but more than one out of every eight shipments fails quality tests. Now, veriTAG is helping the government put things right

    A cloud-based food traceability system built on the blockchain has secured a partnership with the Singapore Food Agency—and has bold plans to build a system that addresses “the ongoing food safety crisis plaguing Southeast Asia.”

  • Tracing food on blockchain
    Technology

    Tracing food on blockchain gains momentum, with shoppers willing to pay big bucks

    As new innovations continue to emerge in the industry, an IBM report says some shoppers would be willing to pay a premium of 35% for fully traceable produce

    In a one night only event, the company invited Washington, D.C. locals—along with food industry executives and legislators—to order curbside meals featuring produce that was traced by HerdX’s blockchain system. Diners were then able to see where their beef had come from—in this case, the Dean and Peeler Meatworks farm in South Texas.

  • Chinese company tracks pork
    Asia & Australia,  Technology

    As Chinese consumers shun pork, premium brands turn to blockchain

    In tech-savvy Shenzhen, few consumers buy pork products with generic labels. Now, QR codes and blockchain are being used to win them round

    In the well-heeled Chinese city of Shenzhen, shoppers are painfully aware of the food safety scandals that have emerged in recent years. Gangs have been caught red-handed selling tons of frozen meat that was more than 40 years old, and hundreds of people have previously been sickened after eating pork laced with steroids to help pigs grow faster.