• Meltem Demirors of CoinShares interviewed by RealVision, October, 2019 (screenshot).
    Bitcoin,  Innovators,  Opinion

    Meltem Demirors questions Wall Street’s involvement in crypto

    But is it really such a bad thing?

    The union of cryptocurrency and Wall Street is much like a Medieval arranged marriage: A little bit of wealth is at stake but everyone seems miserable and most people involved are in need of a bath. Few are as upset about the whole thing as those who are involved in crypto for ideological reasons—or, at least, those who say they are.

  • The Madison Blockchain Hackathon, 2018 (via MouseBelt).
    Innovators

    New Blockchain Education Alliance goal: Attracting top talent fresh out of school to blockchain

    Created by blockchain accelerator MouseBelt, the group has attracted partners like the Stellar Development Foundation and TRON.

    Blockchain accelerator MouseBelt announced it has joined with more than a dozen firms to create the Blockchain Education Alliance, aimed at attracting students to the industry.

  • Digital Asset Holdings Founder Eric Saraniecki, CEO of Ripple Brad Garlinghouse, Jeremy Millar, Chief of Staff of Consensys, Jeff Dorman, CIO of Arca (image via Twitter).
    Innovators

    Inside the invite-only Cumberland Global Summit

    We get the goods from crypto’s elite at the year’s most elite conference

    As the crypto business matures, a robust—some would say never-ending—series of industry conferences has arisen to provide reasons for players in the space to gather in person. Perhaps the most elite of these is the yearly Cumberland Global Summit.

  • Spencer Dinwiddie Cred savings platform
    Cryptocurrencies,  Innovators,  Regulation

    Spencer Dinwiddie plans rebound from NBA $13.5 million tokenization rejection

    The Brooklyn Nets star guard plans to meet with the league to argue that selling a cryptocurrency backed by his $34 million contract doesn’t violate NBA rules

    Despite league opposition, Brooklyn Nets star and cryptocurrency enthusiast Spencer Dinwiddie hasn’t given up on plans to tokenize his $34.4 million contract and sell it to investors on the Ethereum blockchain. On September 26, Dinwiddie announced plans to offer tokens worth up to $13.5 million of his three-year contract to investors, trading up-front cash for his per-game payments. His contract is guaranteed, so investors would not lose their money if he is injured. The next day, the NBA told Dinwiddie that the plan violated the league’s collective bargaining agreement with the National Basketball Players Association, which says a player cannot “assign or otherwise transfer” his salary, the New York Times…

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