• Mike Bloomber
    Politics,  Regulation

    Bloomberg promises clarity for crypto as president

    Whether the billionaire’s ‘get tough on Wall Street’ platform will be good or bad for the cryptocurrency industry remains to be seen

    Presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg on Tuesday rolled out his plan to rein in Wall Street. As part of that, he wants to provide clear but tough regulations for cryptocurrency and initial coin offerings as well.

  • Andrew Yang withdraws democratic primary
    Cryptocurrencies,  Politics

    Andrew Yang, crypto’s favorite son, ends his presidential run

    The blockchain enthusiast withdrew from the presidential primary after poor showings in Iowa and New Hampshire

    “I am the math guy,” Yang said, “and it is clear tonight from these numbers that we are not going to win this race.” His presidential platform was the first to incorporate formal policies on cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology.

  • Andrew Yang Iowa Democratic caucus blockchain voting
    Politics,  Technology

    Iowa primary debacle could boost blockchain-based voting

    The first Democratic presidential primary fell flat after reporting problems that might have been avoided with blockchain balloting

    A disastrous switchover to an unready-for-primetime app for reporting vote tallies left Iowa's critical, first-in-the-nation caucus results completely unknown amid claims of unspecified “inconsistencies” and chaos.

  • Brooklyn_Nets_Spencer Dinwiddie (Tdorante10 via Wikimedia commons)
    Cryptocurrencies,  Innovators,  Regulation

    Spencer Dinwiddie plans rebound from NBA $13.5 million tokenization rejection

    The Brooklyn Nets star guard plans to meet with the league to argue that selling a cryptocurrency backed by his $34 million contract doesn’t violate NBA rules

    Despite league opposition, Brooklyn Nets star and cryptocurrency enthusiast Spencer Dinwiddie hasn’t given up on plans to tokenize his $34.4 million contract and sell it to investors on the Ethereum blockchain. On September 26, Dinwiddie announced plans to offer tokens worth up to $13.5 million of his three-year contract to investors, trading up-front cash for his per-game payments. His contract is guaranteed, so investors would not lose their money if he is injured. The next day, the NBA told Dinwiddie that the plan violated the league’s collective bargaining agreement with the National Basketball Players Association, which says a player cannot “assign or otherwise transfer” his salary, the New York Times…