• crypto users poor security practices
    Cryptocurrencies,  Technology

    Survey sheds light on crypto users’ poor security practices

    A quarter of the people who took part in the study by hardware wallet maker Ngrave are less secure than they expected to be—and only 1% are safer

    While losses were down substantially in 2020, according to CipherTrace, crypto fraud, thefts, and hacks still accounted for $1.8 billion through October. That includes September’s $281 million hack of the KuCoin exchange in September.

  • Exchanges start delisting XRP
    Regulation,  Ripple,  XRP

    Exchanges start delisting XRP following SEC action against Ripple

    Citing concerns that it is illegal to trade unregistered securities, at least three small cryptocurrency exchanges halted XRP trading today

    Cryptocurrency exchanges OSL, Beaxy, and CrossTower suspended trading in XRP on Dec. 23 after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a lawsuit claiming the fourth-largest cryptocurrency is an unregistered security sold by American blockchain giant Ripple.

  • Fireblocks launches Asset Transfer Network
    Technology

    Targeting institutions, Fireblocks launches Asset Transfer Network

    The digital asset transaction platform connects financial institutions and exchanges, streamlining transfers, eliminating middlemen, and securing transfers

    Backed by Fidelity, Fireblocks is designed to transfer assets transparently, quickly, and securely on-chain, the company said. It currently supports more than 200 cryptocurrency tokens, moving $9.2B in digital assets each month.

  • Cryptojacking
    Cryptocurrencies

    Cryptojacking skyrockets 629%: McAfee

    Report also says malware threats were up by more than 1,100%

    A new report issued this week by software security firm McAfee shows a stunning surge in malicious attacks on computers to mine cryptocurrency. McAfee Labs reports a 629 percent increase in coin miner malware found during the first quarter of 2018. Malware threats, the report says, were up by more than 1,100 percent. The method, called cryptojacking, takes over a system, allowing hackers to discreetly confiscate computing power and mine cryptocurrency in the background. A system’s user can be unaware this is going on, other than noticing their computer operating slower than normal. “Compared with well-established cybercrime activities such as data theft and ransomware, cryptojacking is simpler, more straightforward, and…